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Introduction to Leaky Gut and 5 Things to do now

In a nutshell leaky gut is defined as IMPAIRED INTESTINAL BARRIER PERMEABILITY, or intestinal hyper-permeability. What does this mean? It means that the lining of the gut, which is tasked with letting in what you are designed to let in and block what you are designed to block, isn’t working well in the BLOCKING portion of it’s job. And due to inflammation, prior and resulting, the first part of the job, the letting in part, also doesn’t work right.

Remember: the gut lining is meant to protect you from all the bad stuff that passes through with three layers.

  • Physical
  • Mucosal
  • Epethelial: where immune and neurological functions happen

In another nutshell, this dysfunction in permeability of the gut lining goes like this:

  • Too much protein ZONULIN released
  • the tight junctions of the gut lining are loosened (tight junctions are protein structures that seal up cells)
  • This allows antigens to pass into the mucosal lining (another “failsafe” barrier in the design)
  • The liver has to work harder, and the immune system kicks into overdrive (think auto immune issues and inflammation)

When the gut is leaky, the immune system has less energy for other disturbances due to the gut’s constant needs. This can lead to infections and illness, while also affecting mood and hormone balance, among with many other things. Nutrient Absorption is negatively impacted as a resulting of the intestinal microvilli being damaged by leaky gut. So kind of link celiac but not as concrete.

Leaky gut really isn’t easily diagnosed yet due to its commonality of the symptoms. However, I would say and a lot of other more educated people would agree that most people have some degree of leaky gut.

In fact … babies are born with a gut thats not fully developed and a bit leaky, thus why the breast milk is designed the way it is. And a big reason why babies get colic and gerd.

IN OTHER WORDS

  1. Undigested particles (antigens) sneak through the gut lining into the bloodstream
  2. The Immune system creates antibodies for the antigens.
  3. The immune system produces an inflammatory response in anticipation of more antigens.

SYMPTOMS

  1. Food intolerances
  2. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies, run away train
  3. Brain fog
  4. Bloating, diarrhea and GI issues
  5. Thyroid issues
  6. Skin rashes / eczema
  7. Joint Pain
  8. Headaches
  9. Mood swings
  10. Excessive Fatigue

POSSIBLE CAUSES

  1. DIET
    • Lectins from grains (part of the anti gluten/grain movement)
    • Nightshades (google it)
    • Legumes
    • Dairy
    • Processed foods: Additives, emulsifiers (food stabilizers) Like in almond milk!!
  2. Imbalanced Microbiome
    • Candida overgrowth
    • Candida secreting toxin that causes epithelial cells to shrink
  3. Modern Lifestyle
    • Antibiotics
    • NSAIDs . (ib)
    • Environmental toxins, such as antibacterials
    • STRESS

REPAIRING LEAKY GUT

Test if you want them: ELISA, Lactulose/mannitol, IgE

4 R’s of Functional Medicine

  1. REMOVE
    • Elimination diets
    • Supplementing with herbal antimicrobials
    • Rotation diets: limit specific food exposure to 24 hour cycles, then avoid the next 3-4 days
  2. REPLACE
    • Digestive bitters
    • HCL supplements
    • L-glutamine. Athletes should be taking this any way for recovery
  3. RE-INOCULATE
    • Probiotics
    • Think about prebiotics as well
  4. REPAIR MUCOSAL LINING
    • Steps 1,2 and 3
    • Gut-supporting nutrients and foods
      • Bone broth, collagen, L-glutamine
      • Filtered water
      • Protein
      • Honey (replacing sugar)
      • Fermented and cultured foods
      • Healthy fats (coconut oil)

Supplements for Leaky Gut

  1. Zinc carnosine
  2. Aleo Vera
  3. Marshmallow root
  4. Slippery elm bark
  5. Curcumin
  6. Vitamin A
  7. Vitamin D

5 Tips to Fix

  1. Handle Stress
  2. Add L-Glutamine
  3. Take out dairy and grains
  4. Add D3 and magnesium
  5. Eat LESS processed foods, including “healthy” packaged foods

Things that come next

  1. Allergies
  2. Asthma
  3. Autoimmune: Lupus, MS, RA
  4. Psoriasis
  5. Eczema
  6. Inflammatory Bowel
  7. Diabetes
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All about Vitamin D

Vitamin D : fat-soluble vitamin, which is actually a hormone. It is the only vitamin that the body will produces on its own.

  • ergocalciferol-D2
  • cholecalciferol-D3
  • alfacalcidol

Some Facts

  • Helps your body absorb calcium and phosphorus. This is vital for strong and healthy bones.
  • A fall in the concentration of calcium in the bloodstream is detected by the parathyroid glands, which then produce parathyroid hormone. Parathyroid hormone increases the activity of the enzyme (catalyst) that produces active vitamin D. This increase in the concentration of calcium together with vitamin D feeds back to the parathyroid glands to stop further parathyroid hormone release. The production of vitamin D is also directly regulated by calcium, phosphate and calcitriol.
  • Naturally occurring in some foods, added to others, and made by the body when UV lights hits the skin.
  • Must be activated by two produces in the body to be utilized. One is done in the liver, the second is done in the kidney. Very nutshell version.
  • Promotes calcium absorption in the gut
  • Helps prevent hypocalcemic tetany (involuntary contraction of muscles, leading to cramps and spasms)
  • Reduction of inflammation
  • Regulation of many processes such as cell growth, neuromuscular, immune function, and glucose metabolism

Huge Benefits

  • Reduces Depression: Research has shown that vitamin D can serve an important role in regulating mood and reducing depression and anxiety. In one study, scientists found that people with depression who received vitamin D supplements noticed an improvement in their symptoms.
  • Helps facilitate weight loss

Some Sources

  • fatty fish (such as trout, sardines, salmon, tuna, and mackerel)
  • Beef liver, cheese, yogurt and egg yolks
  • Mushrooms provide variable amounts of vitamin D2
  • Fortified foods like milk

Vitamin D and Depression

  • Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with decreased cognitive function, specifically in the realm of mental health
  • Researchers behind a 2013 meta-analysis noticed that study participants with depression also had low vitamin D levels.
  • It’s also worth mentioning here that vitamin D is thought to be able to activate the synthesis of serotonin, a neurotransmitter and hormone that, similar to dopamine, can help to improve your mood.

Vitamin D and Hormones (sex)

  • Testosterone : Studies have found that an adequate level of vitamin D is actually pretty important for regulating this crucial sex hormone.

How Being Deficient Might Feel

  • Fatigue, aches and pains
  • A general sense of not feeling well
  • Severe bone or muscular pain or weakness
  • Stress fractures

Food*Micrograms
(mcg) per
serving
International
Units (IU)
per serving
Percent DV*
Cod liver oil, 1 tablespoon34.01,360170
Trout (rainbow), farmed, cooked, 3 ounces16.264581
Salmon (sockeye), cooked, 3 ounces14.257071
Mushrooms, white, raw, sliced, exposed to UV light, ½ cup9.236646
Milk, 2% milkfat, vitamin D fortified, 1 cup2.912015
Soy, almond, and oat milks, vitamin D fortified, various brands, 1 cup2.5-3.6100-14413-18
Ready-to-eat cereal, fortified with 10% of the DV for vitamin D, 1 serving2.08010
Sardines (Atlantic), canned in oil, drained, 2 sardines1.2466
Egg, 1 large, scrambled**1.1446
Liver, beef, braised, 3 ounces1.0425
Tuna fish (light), canned in water, drained, 3 ounces1.0405
Cheese, cheddar, 1 ounce0.3122
Mushrooms, portabella, raw, diced, ½ cup0.141
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces0.141
Beef, ground, 90% lean, broiled, 3 ounces01.70

Optimal serum concentrations of 25(OH)D for bone and general health have not been established because they are likely to vary by stage of life, by race and ethnicity, and with each physiological measure used [1,13,14]. In addition, although 25(OH)D levels rise in response to increased vitamin D intake, the relationship is nonlinear [1]. The amount of increase varies, for example, by baseline serum levels and duration of supplementation. Resource: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

*Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D are reported in both nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) and nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL). One nmol/L = 0.4 ng/mL, and 1 ng/mL = 2.5 nmol/L.

  • children and teens: 600 IU
  • adults up to age 70: 600 IU
  • adults over age 70: 800 IU
  • pregnant or breastfeeding women: 600 IU


nmol/L*ng/mL*Health status
<30<12Associated with vitamin D deficiency, which can lead to rickets in infants and children and osteomalacia in adults
30 to <5012 to <20Generally considered inadequate for bone and overall health in healthy individuals
≥50≥20Generally considered adequate for bone and overall health in healthy individuals
>125>50Linked to potential adverse effects, particularly at >150 nmol/L (>60 ng/mL)

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